November 17, 2014

5 Reasons Educators Should be Teaching Computer Science, not Computer Programs

Computer science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes. – Edsger Dijkstra 5 Reasons you should be Teaching Computer Science, Not Programs Computer programs, like Microsoft Word, are subject to change; they come and go. Computational thinking concepts are always relevant and can be applied to all computer programs. Computer science requires analytical thinking for problem solving and creativity in all subject matters. Computer science learnings stick with students long after they leave the classroom, and are carried on throughout their careers. Computer science teaches logic and applied mathematics. Computer applications do not teach this. They typically make a task easier rather than teaching someone how to perform it themselves or create the programming that makes the application function. It’s important for students to not just use software, but to know how that software is made so they can improve upon and use it properly. With standardized interfaces that are simple to learn, students can typically learn apps on their own, however computer science requires more facilitation by an knowledgeable educator. Students can learn about multiple subjects at once in computer science — including math, science, and engineering. They improve their sequential and analytical skills. Educators can work together to create an interdisciplinary approach to get students engaged in tech, an in-demand career field with high paying job opportunities. Computer science knowledge is much broader than a particular program. It can be applied to other subjects, and ultimately many professions. All professionals would fare better with strong analytical and logic skills that are learned in a well constructed computer science class. Computer science is the new literacy. As more information is found through computers, and more computer automation is taking place, it’s important for everyone to know what’s going on “behind the curtain.” Learning computer programs teaches students to be consumers of technology rather than creators of it. Computer science requires students to think critically about how programs are created and used, and it encourages them to come with creative solutions to complex problems both inside and outside of the classroom. Learn Computational Thinking at our FREE Webinar 5 Reasons Educators Should be Teaching Computer Science, not Computer Programs was originally published on We Can Code IT 5 Reasons Educators Should be Teaching Computer Science, not Computer Programs was originally published on We Can Code IT

“After the We Can Code IT on-site training at University Hospitals, we embraced Agile software development methodology with tremendous success. On a project that was not going well, we were able to develop 1-week iterations where we did a mini-planning session on Monday, committed to stories for the week and then completely tested them by the end of the week. Our teams have really enjoyed moving to a more structured Agile environment with much more collaboration.”

– Andy Laytin, Manager, IT Development, SQL DBAs Architecture, University Hospitals

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