We Can Code IT is the leading computer programming school with a focus on inclusion and diversity founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 2013. Our coding academy is on-track to graduate nearly 200 students this year, 80% being women and people of color. By comparison, traditional universities graduate only 12%!

Coding Bootcamp Application Process

1

See If Coding Is Right For You

Take our assessment to see if our accelerated coding bootcamp is a good fit for you.
2

Apply to Bootcamp!

Fill out this short coding bootcamp application. It’s free and easy to apply!
3

Schedule an Interview

Schedule an Interview with us, sit in on a bootcamp, and meet the students & instructors.

Student Stories

Upcoming Events

july, 2016

Coding Bootcamp, Full-time Fall 2016Cleveland, OH Starts 9/6/2016

In the News

July 21, 2016
Computer Science Education Policy Microsoft The Hill

We Can Code IT represents at The Hill & Microsoft’s Policy Discussion on Computer Science Education

We Can Code IT instructor, Lauren Holloway, speaks on The Workforce of the Future: A Policy Discussion on STEM and Computer Science Education Cleveland’s own We Can Code IT speaks at The Workforce of the Future: A Policy Discussion on STEM and Computer Science education. The panel, consisting of We Can Code IT instructor Lauren Holloway, Microsoft Executive Vice President Peggy Johnson, and STEM Coalition Executive Director James Brown, will discuss America’s long-term global competitiveness as it relates to STEM and Computer Science. Given that 2/3 of jobs in STEM will soon be in the field of Computer Science, our workforce needs to be trained. The event takes place at Hodge’s Restaurant in Cleveland on Thursday, July 21st, 2016 at 10 am and will stream live at http://thehill.com/video/events/288219-the-workforce-of-the-future-a-policy-discussion-on-stem-and-computer-science
July 8, 2016
Mel Photo

Mel McGee is a woman who’s made her way in the male-dominated world of technology.

She’s been a techie since she was a kid, writing her own programs and helping her real estate agent parents incorporate the latest technology into their business. At about 10 years old, she hooked up the family’s first modem and was uploading real estate properties to the multiple listing service (MLS). “I thought it was the coolest thing ever,” she said, adding, “Yes, I am a geek.” Now McGee is a serial tech entrepreneur and educator who’s on a mission to abolish that nerdy stigma and make careers for girls in the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) more accessible. “Females are way under-represented in STEM fields, and it’s absolutely not because of any kind of innate ability,” she said. “It’s a cultural issue. (People think) it’s not feminine, that it’s geeky.” From kindergarten to 12th grade, girls’ participation in math and science nationally just about matches that of boys, according to the National Girls Collaborative Project. But in college, the disparity develops quickly, with women making up only 18.2% of computer science graduates nationally. Read more at www.crainscleveland.com/article/20140713/AWARDS01/307139989/mel-mcgee
July 8, 2016
Minecraft We Can Code IT Coding Bootcamp

Sometimes A Little More Minecraft May Be Quite All Right

Before taking vacation, I caught up with Mel McGee during a coding camp she runs in Shaker Heights, Ohio. She was explaining to a handful of preteens how to use red stone dust to make an electrical wire. “We try to drop some engineering stuff, real-world concepts in there and how it relates to what they’re building in Minecraft,” she says. So, if you’re using it for good, does it count as screen time? I asked Dr. Victor Strasburger, who helped write the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations 15 years ago. “We’re not a bunch of old fuddy-duddies sitting around trying to figure out how we can poke a hole in kids’ entertainment options,” he says. Research has established that kids who sit in front of TV or video for hours have higher rates of obesity and possibly other health problems. But Strasburger says it’s more complicated than just setting strict time limits. The academy has no set recommendations on educational screen time or even the use of different types of screens. Read more at http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/20/423884493/sometimes-a-little-more-minecraft-may-be-quite-all-right